NAVYPEDIA



HOME
FIGHTING SHIPS OF THE WORLD
VENEZUELA
OTHER FIGHTING SHIPS
MARISCAL SUCRE gunboat (1887/1912)


Photo



Mariscal Sucre 1933

Ships


Name No Yard No Builder Laid down Launched Comp Fate
Mariscal Sucre (ex-Isla de Cuba)     Armstrong, Newcastle, UK 3.1886 11.12.1886 1887 // 4.1912 gunnery drill hulk 1929, sunk as target 22.1.1952


Technical data


Displacement normal, t

1030

Displacement full, t

 

Length, m

56.1 pp 58.6 oa

Breadth, m

8.87

Draught, m

3.84 max

No of shafts

2

Machinery

2 HTE, 2 cylindrical boilers

Power, h. p.

1897 natural, 2627 forced draught

Max speed, kts

14.2 natural, 15.9 forced draught

Fuel, t

coal 160

Endurance, nm(kts)2640(10)
Armament

2 x 1 - 102/40 Mk III/IV/V/VI, 2 x 1 - 57/50 Driggs-Schroeder Mk II/III, 6 x 1 - 47/40-45 Driggs-Schroeder Mk I/II, 2 x 1 - 37/40 Driggs-Schroeder

Military load300 troops
Complement

92



Standard scale images


sister-ship <i>Isla de Luzón </i>1898
sister-ship Isla de Luzón 1898


Graphics


<i>Mariscal Sucre </i>1933
Mariscal Sucre 1933


Project history

Former Spanish protected cruiser Isla de Cuba, sunk 1.5.1898 in battle at Cavite. She was salvaged by the United States and after repair and re-arming commissioned by US Navy under former name. Ship was bought by Venezuela 2.4.1912 as an element of naval reform, undertaken by the Government of General Gomez. Ship was converted to military transport, capable to carry up to 300 troops and armed with 2 102mm, 2 57mm and 6 47mm guns; by the end of WWI she can make no more than 10kts.

Modernizations

None.

Naval service

For a peace time she was transferred to naval school. Ship was discarded from fleet list in 1929 and converted to non-self-propelled gunnery drill ship. During Second World War she was used as floating battery at island Las-Aves, fulfilling also a role of a headquarters vessel.