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fighting ships of the world

UNITED STATES NAVY (UNITED STATES OF AMERICA)

CRUISERS

PENNSYLVANIA armoured cruisers (1905-1908)

Maryland 1905

No Name Builder Laid down Launched Comm Fate
ACR4, 7/1920- CA4 Pennsylvania, 8/1912- Pittsburgh Cramp, Philadelphia 7/8/1901 22/8/1903 9/3/1905 stricken 10/1931
ACR5, 7/1920- CA5 West Virginia, 11/1916- Huntington Newport News 16/9/1901 18/4/1903 23/2/1905 stricken 3/1930
ACR6 California, 9/1914- San Diego Union Iron Wks, San Francisco 7/5/1902 28/4/1904 1/8/1907 sunk 19/7/1918
ACR7, 7/1920- CA7 Colorado, 11/1916- Pueblo Cramp, Philadelphia 25/4/1901 25/4/1903 19/1/1905 BU 10/1930
ACR8, 7/1920- CA8 Maryland, 11/1916- Frederick Newport News 29/10/1901 12/9/1903 18/4/1905 stricken 11/1929
ACR9, 7/1920- CA9 South Dakota, 6/1920- Huron Union Iron Wks, San Francisco 30/9/1902 21/7/1904 27/1/1908 stricken 11/1929
  

Displacement normal, t

13680

Displacement full, t

15138

Length, m

153.6

Breadth, m

21.2

Draught, m

7.34 mean

No of shafts

2

Machinery

ACR4, 7: VTE, 32 Niclausse boilers

ACR5, 6, 8, 9: VTE, 16 Babcock & Wilcox boilers

Power, h. p.

23000

Max speed, kts

22

Fuel, t

ACR4, 7: coal 1980

ACR5, 8: coal 1850

ACR6, 9: coal 2075  

Endurance, nm(kts) 5000(10)
Armour, mm

Krupp and Harvey steel - belt: 152 - 127, (89 at ships ends), deck: 102 - 38, barbettes: 152 - 76, turrets: 165 - 152, casemates: 127, CT: 229

Armament

2 x 2 - 203/42 Mk V, 14 x 1 - 152/49 Mk VI/VIII, 18 x 1 - 76/50 Mk III/V/VI, 12 x 1 - 47/40-45 Driggs-Schroeder Mk I/II, 2 x 1 - 37/40 Driggs-Schroeder heavy Mk I, 2 - 450 TT (beam)

Complement

829 - 928

Ship project history: Authorised under the Acts of 3/3/1899 (first three) and 7/6/1900 (second three). These ships are perhaps better known as renamed. Much larger than the two previous US armoured cruisers, they were distinctly undergunned for their size.

Ship protection: Main belt covered machinery only. Its thickness was 127mm except 152mm waterline. Armoured deck over citadel was 38mm behind the belt at flat part and connected with lower belt edge by 102mm slopes. This deck was 102mm with 102mm slopes at ship ends. Barbette bases and ammunition tubes had 76mm protection. Upper part of barbettes was 152mm thick. Turrets had 165-152mm sides and 38mm crowns. Secondary guns were protected by 127mm casemates.

Modernizations: 1909 - 1911, all: - 2 x 2 - 203/42; + 2 x 2 - 203/45 Mk VI; new cage foremasts were installed

1914 - 1919, Pittsburgh: - 6 x 1 - 152/50 (may be temporarily), (6 - 8) x 1 - 76/50; + 2 x 1 - 76/52 Mk X; boilers were replaced by 16 Babcock & Wilcox

1914 - 1919, Huntington, San Diego, Frederick, Huron: - 10 x 1 - 152/50 (may be temporarily), (6 - 8) x 1 - 76/50; + 2 x 1 - 76/52 Mk X

1914 - 1919, Pueblo: - 10 x 1 - 152/50 (may be temporarily), (6 - 8) x 1 - 76/50; + 2 x 1 - 76/52 Mk X; boilers were replaced by 16 Babcock & Wilcox

1917, Huntington (temporarily): + 1 catapult, 4 airplanes, 1 balloon

1922, Pittsburgh: 4 boilers and 1 funnel were removed.

Naval service: The first landing by an aeroplane on a ship was made by Eugene Ely, in a Curtiss pusher, on a platform erected over the quarterdeck and after turret of Pennsylvania, at anchor in San Francisco Bay on 18 January 1911, and for a time in 1917 Huntington was equipped with a catapult and four planes, and also operated a balloon. She was finally decommissioned in 1920, Frederick in 1922, Huron and Pueblo in 1927, the latter after six years as a receiving ship al New York, and Pittsburg in 1931. San Diego was 19/7/1918 either mined or torpedoed by German submarine U156 and capsized and sank in about 20 minutes. The explosion was abreast of the fore part of the port engine room, and this and several nearby compartments flooded, and water also entered the port after boiler room, and as the ship heeled, came in through the main deck gun ports.

      

 

Pittsburgh 1919

 

 

Huron 1923

Ivan Gogin, 2014