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fighting ships of the world

ROYAL NAVY (UNITED KINGDOM)

CAPITAL SHIPS & MONITORS

HUMBER monitors (1913-1914/1914)

Humber 1913

Name No Yard No Builder Laid down Launched Comp Fate
Humber (ex-Javary) N15, M00, M06 433 Vickers, Barrow 24/8/1912 17/6/1913 11/1913 // 8/1914 sold 9/1920
Severn (ex-Solimoes) D70, M2A 434 Vickers, Barrow 24/8/1912 19/8/1913 1/1914 // 8/1914 sold for BU 5/1921
Mersey (ex-Madeira) P62, M1A, M10 435 Vickers, Barrow 24/8/1912 30/9/1913 2/1914 // 8/1914 sold for BU 5/1921

 

Displacement normal, t

1260

Displacement full, t

1520

Length, m

81.3

Breadth, m

14.9

Draught, m

1.70 deep

No of shafts

2

Machinery

2 VTE, 2 boilers

Power, h. p.

1450

Max speed, kts

9.5

Fuel, t

coal 187 + oil 90
Endurance, nm(kts) 4000(8)

Armour, mm

belt: 76 - 38, bulkheads: 38, barbette: 89, turret face: 102

Armament

1 x 2 - 152/50 BL Mk XIV/XV, 2 x 1 - 120/18 Mk I howitzers, 4 x 1 - 47/50 3pdr Vickers Mk II, 6 x 1 - 7.7/87

Complement

140

Ship project history: Three small river monitors had been ordered by Brazil from Vickers in January 1912, and the first, Javary, had started trials in October 1913. All three were ready by February 1914, but by this time the Brazilian Navy could not afford to pay for them and they were laid up in the Devonshire Dock at Barrow awaiting a buyer. Just before the outbreak of war the Admiralty made arrangements to buy them for £155,000 each to prevent them from falling into enemy hands, and they were formally taken over on 3 August 1914. Although nominally capable of 12kts none of them achieved double figures in RN service, although Javary had reached 11.5kts in 1913. They were totally unsuited to operate in the open sea, as their shallow draught permitted them to be blown sideways.

Protection: Machinery and magazine were protected by 76-38mm belt and 38mm bulkheads.

Modernizations: 9-10/1914, all: additional 25mm plating over the magazine; + 1 x 1 - 47/50 3pdr Vickers Mk I (AA)

end 1914, Severn, Mersey: - 1 x 2 - 152/50; + 2 x 1 - 152/45 BL Mk VII (one fwd and aft)

12/1914, Humber: + 1 x 1 - 152/45 BL Mk VII

1919, Humber: - 1 x 1 - 47/50; + 1 x 1 - 76/45 20cwt QF Mk I

Naval service: All three monitors were paid off in 1919. Humber was sold in September 1920 to Dutch salvage company, converted to crane barge and was broken up after WWII.

Humber 1915

Many thanks to Wolfgang Stöhr for additional information on this page.

Ivan Gogin, 2008-14