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fighting ships of the world

IMPERIAL RUSSIAN NAVY / SOVIET NAVY (RUSSIA / USSR)

CRUISERS

BAYAN armoured cruisers (1902-1911)

Bayan (i) 1903

Bayan 1904

Admiral Makarov 1917

Bayan (ii) 1917

Name No Builder Laid down Launched Comp Fate
Баян <Bayan>   F C de la Méditerranée, La Seyne, France 12/1898 12/6/1900 10/1902 sunk 8/12/1904
Адмирал Макаров <Admiral Makarov>   F C de la Méditerranée, La Seyne, France 4/4/1905 9/5/1906 29/5/1908 sold 8/1922
Паллада <Pallada>   New Admiralty, St. Petersburg 17/5/1905 10/11/1905 21/2/1911 sunk 11/10/1914
Баян <Bayan>   New Admiralty, St. Petersburg 15/8/1905 15/8/1907 13/12/1911 sold 7/1922

 

Displacement normal, t

Bayan (i): 7725

others: 7890

Displacement full, t

Bayan (i): 7802

others: 8250

Length, m

Bayan (i), Bayan (ii): 135.0 pp 137.0 oa

Admiral Makarov: 135.0 pp 138.8 oa

Pallada: 135.0 pp 138.7 oa

Breadth, m

17.5

Draught, m

6.44 - 6.55 max

No of shafts

2

Machinery

VTE, 26 Belleville boilers

Power, h. p.

16500

Max speed, kts

21

Fuel, t

Bayan (i): coal 1200

Admiral Makarov: coal 1050

Pallada: coal 1170

Bayan (ii): coal 1000

Endurance, nm(kts) 2100(14)

Armour, mm

Bayan (i): Harvey-nickel steel; belt: 200 - 100, bulkhead: 203 - 178, upper belt: 80, casemate: 80, deck: 50, turrets: 150, barbettes: 170, CT: 160

others: belt: 175 - 100, bulkhead: 100, upper belt: 60, casemate: 60, deck: 30, turrets: 132, barbettes: 150, CT: 136

Armament

Bayan (i): 2 x 1 - 203/43, 8 x 1 - 152/44 Canet, 20 x 1 - 75/48 Canet, 8 x 1 - 47/40 Hotchkiss, 2 x 1 - 37/20 Hotchkiss, 2 - 381 TT (beam)

others: 2 x 1 - 203/43, 8 x 1 - 152/44 Canet, 22 x 1 - 75/48 Canet, 2 - 450 TT (beam, 6)

Complement

573

Ship project history: Possessed good seagoing capacities and manoeuvrability, but to the beginning of WWI ships have morally become outdated because of the weak and unsuccessfully arranged artillery.

Ship protection, Bayan (i): Main belt (1.8m high) had 200mm thickness between fore superstructure and main mast (tapering to 100mm at lower edge). Ship ends (fwd to the stem and aft part, ending in 20m  from the stern) were protected by 100mm armour. This belt was closed by 203-178mm aft bulkhead. Upper belt (over 200mm part of main belt) had 80mm thickness and protected 152mm guns, 75mm gun casemates had also 80mm protection. Flat 50mm main deck was connected with upper edge of main belt. Turrets had 150mm sides and 30mm roofs, barbettes had 170mm armour. CT had 160mm sides.

Ship protection, later cruisers: Main belt (1.8m high) had 175mm thickness between fore superstructure and main mast (tapering to 60mm at lower edge). Ship ends (fwd to the stem and aft part, ending in 20m  from the stern) were protected by 100mm armour. This belt was closed by 100mm aft bulkhead. Upper belt (over 175mm part of main belt) had 60mm thickness and protected 152mm guns, 75mm gun casemates had 60mm protection. Flat 30mm main deck was connected with upper edge of main belt. Turrets had 132mm sides and 30mm roofs, barbettes had 150mm armour. CT had 136mm sides. Deck 75mm guns had 25mm shields.

Modernizations: 1916, Admiral Makarov, Bayan: - 20 x 1 - 75/48; + 1 x 1 - 203/43, 4 x 1 - 152/44 Canet

Naval service: Bayan (i) was sunk on shallow water by Japanese siege guns 8/12/1904 and later destroyed by own crew 2/1/1905 to avoid capture by Japanese, but she was salvaged by them in December, repaired and commissioned as Aso. Pallada was 21/9/1914 torpedoed by German submarine U26 and has sunk with all hands. After the termination of Civil war both remained cruisers were stricken from a fleet list and in 1926 broken up.

Bayan (i) 1902

Admiral Makarov 1909

Admiral Makarov 1914

 

© Ivan Gogin, 2009-14