home

fighting ships of the world

KAISERLICHE MARINE (GERMANY)

TORPEDO SHIPS

V99 destroyers (1915)

V99 1915

Name Yard No Builder Laid down Launched Comp Fate
V99 384 Vulcan, Stettin 1914 9/2/1915 4/1915 sunk 17/8/1915
V100 385 Vulcan, Stettin 1914 8/3/1915 6/1915 interned 11/1918, scuttled 21/6/1919

  

Displacement normal, t

1350

Displacement full, t

1847

Length, m

99.0 oa 98.0 wl

Breadth, m

9.36

Draught, m

4.05

No of shafts

2

Machinery

AEG-Vulcan steam turbines, 4 Marine boilers

Power, h. p.

40000

Max speed, kts

36.5

Fuel, t

oil 519

Endurance, nm(kts)

2250(20)

Armament

4 x 1 - 88/42 TK L/45 C/14, 2 x 2 - 500 TT, 2 x 1 - 500 TT (8), 24 mines

Complement

114

Ship project history: One aspect of the Czarist Russian fleet construction programme was the building of a modern yard at St Petersburg, which was undertaken by Blohm & Voss and officially opened on 29 November 1913. When war broke out four powerful destroyers were under construction there: Leytenant Ilyin, Kapitan Konon Zotov, Gavriil and Mikhail. Their 40,000shp turbine sets were being built by Blohm & Voss at Hamburg and were seized immediately. The yard proposed to the German Navy the building of destroyers around these sets within six months. Against the opposition of the torpedo authorities - who argued that these boats might not fit into the German flotillas - von Tirpitz pushed through the scheme and they (plus additional boats) were built. They were the first three funnelled boats in the German destroyer arm, and were faster (37.4kts for the B109 group on trials) and more heavily armed than contemporary German destroyers and had better seaworthiness. They were referred to as 'destroyers' in German sources, as opposed to the 'high seas torpedo-boats'.

Modernizations: 1916, V100: - 4 x 1 - 88/42; + 4 x 1 - 105/42 TK L/45 C/16

Naval service: V100 was sunk in the Baltic 17/8/1915 by Russian destroyer Novik.

Ivan Gogin, 2014