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fighting ships of the world

KAISERLICHE MARINE (GERMANY)

TORPEDO SHIPS

G108 large seagoing torpedo boats (1902-1903)

G108 1902

Name Yard No Builder Laid down Launched Comp Fate
G108, 9/1914- T108 91 Germaniawerft, Kiel 1900 7/9/1901 3/1902 TS, discarded 3/1921
G109, 9/1914- T109 92 Germaniawerft, Kiel 1900 9/11/1901 6/1902 discarded 3/1921
G110, 9/1914- T110 93 Germaniawerft, Kiel 1901 9/9/1902 1/1903 discarded 3/1921
G111, 9/1914- T111 94 Germaniawerft, Kiel 1901 2/4/1902 7/1902 TS till 1916, discarded 3/1920
G112, 9/1914- T112 95 Germaniawerft, Kiel 1901 19/6/1902 9/1902 discarded 3/1920
G113, 9/1914- T113 96 Germaniawerft, Kiel 1901 9/8/1902 10/1902 discarded 3/1921

  

Displacement normal, t

330

Displacement full, t

440

Length, m

65.8 oa 65.5 wl

Breadth, m

6.70

Draught, m

2.87 deep load

No of shafts

2

Machinery

VTE, 3 Marine boilers

Power, h. p.

6600

Max speed, kts

28

Fuel, t

coal 112

Endurance, nm(kts)

1225(17)

Armament

3 x 1 - 50/37 SK L/40 C/92, 3 x 1 - 450 TT (5)

Complement

57

Ship project history: Apart from the experimental turbine vessel (another was building at the end of the period), these units, classed as large torpedo boats but, despite their lighter guns, really the equivalent of contemporary foreign destroyers, show a large degree of homogeneity. They all shared the 'trade mark' of the torpedo tube placed before the bridge in a well deck between the raised forecastle and the charthouse. All had two funnels. In fact this design was a combination of the best features of the D9 and the D10, of the German torpedo boat traditional design, and of the British destroyer. The result was a sturdy and seaworthy vessel, not as fast as foreign boats, but probably more useful than most.

Modernizations: 1910s, T108: - 3 x 1 - 50/37; + 2 x 1 - 88/42 TK L/45 C/14

1910s, T110: - 3 x 1 - 50/37; + 2 x 1 - 88/27 SK L/30 C/89

1910s, T113: - 1 x 1 - 50/37; + 1 x 1 - 88/32 SK L/35 C/01 or 1 x 1 - 88/27 SK L/30 C/89 or 1 x 1 - 88/27 TK L/30 C/09

Naval service: No significant events.

Ivan Gogin, 2014