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fighting ships of the world

COLOMBIAN NAVY (COLOMBIA)

OTHER FIGHTING SHIPS

BOGOTA patrol gunboats

Bogota 1933?

Name No Builder Laid down Launched Comp Fate
Bogota (ex-Tonsberg I, ex-Helgoland, ex-M139)   Tecklenborg, Geestemünde, Germany 1918 12/3/1919 6/1919 // 2/1933 collision 1946
Cordova (ex-Dixmude, ex-Dinnard, ex-Grille, ex-M158)   Nordseeerke, Emden, Germany 1918 1920 1920 // 2/1933 sunk as target 11/6/1937

 

Displacement standard, t

508

Displacement full, t

630

Length, m

56.1 wl 59.6 oa

Breadth, m

7.30

Draught, m

2.15

No of shafts

2

Machinery

VTE, 2 Marine boilers

Power, h. p.

1850

Max speed, kts

16

Fuel, t

coal 160

Endurance, nm(kts)  

Armament

1 x 1 - 88/45 Tbts L/45, 2 x 1 - 75/35 M1915-18, 2 x 2 - 13.2/76

Complement

40

Ship project history: Former German minesweepers M139 and M158 of M1916 type. By the First World War end they remained incomplete, and completed in 1919 as self-propelled barges Helgoland and Grille; in 1922 they were sold to Norway and France respectively as Tonsberg I and Dinnard (later Dixmude). In 1932 they were bought by Colombia in France, received names Bogota and Cordova and armed. Boilers can use coal and fire wood. Ships arrived with French crews to Brazilian port Belen 24/2/1933. They were used as patrols and river gunboats.

Modernizations: None.

Naval service: Cordova in 1937 was stricken and 11/6/1937 sunk as target by destroyers Antioqoia and Caldas. Bogota was lost in 1946 as a result of collision.

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Ivan Gogin, 2011